Suzanne Berton

Berton Suzanne

Suzanne Berton
(1956- )
Nationality: ca Canada



Artist's estimate : CA$249.00

In 1956, Suzanne Berton was born of French Canadian parents in a large family of nine children in Sudbury, Ontario Canada. Her father played a role in encouraging her in the arts as a very young child, but in those days very little was taught in schools. Suzanne remembers seeing her father draw portraits of family members as a very young child.

THOUGH HER LIFE HAS CHANGED - through physical limitations - Suzanne finds herself unable to stop her artistic journey. "Even if I am limited going out to paint nature, people have generously contributed images of their nature walks and holidays. Not everybody can climb a mountain or paddle a river to get scenes to paint on site."

Later in life, she moved to Thunder Bay and lived there for about 17 years. At that time, her artistic life really took hold; here, she developed her art through figure drawing lessons, art courses, and daily practical use. Suzanne also developed a writing style at that time. She had two strong wishes at time: become a writer and an artist. The dream lives on.

Today, Suzanne lives in Kingston, Ontario, which is often called the First Capital of Canada and which resides on the shores of Lake Ontario. Two great attractions are located in this wonderful city, the Royal Military College and Old Fort Henry. In this city she now calls home, Suzanne develops and uses her art daily. Currently, she is developing a love relationships with the historic Limestone buildings.

In 2004, she did two solo art exhibits in Kingston, one at the Salon Brisebois, Galerie "les-coups-montés," and another at The Upstairs Gallery. She also participated in a Group Exhibit at the Upstairs Gallery in December of 2004. In addition she did another one in 2006 at the Main library in Kingston, and she is planning to do more in 2007 and 2008.

Her goals: continue showing her art either online or in exhibits. "My art is meant to be viewed, not tucked away in a box in the corner of the attic." The same holds true with her writing, "My writing is meant to be read, not locked away in a journal in a desk." In short, she says, "My art is meant to be seen and my writing meant to be read."

"There are time, when I believe I've done it all in art, but something new idea comes up and I am challenged to do more. What a great way to be creative."


Articles:

Love Limestone City

Love Limestone City


In 1956, Suzanne Berton was born a French Canadian (bilingual: French and English) from good French Canadian parents, a large family of nine children in Sudbury, Ontario Canada. Her father played a role in encouraging her in the arts as a very young child, but in those days very little was taught in schools. Suzanne remembers seeing her father draw portraits of family members as a very young child.

Later in life, she moved to Thunder Bay and lived there for about 17 years. At that time, her artistic life really took hold; here, she developed her art through figure drawing lessons, art courses, and daily practical use. Suzanne also developed a writing style at that time. She had two strong wishes at time: become a writer and an artist. The dream lives on.

Today, Suzanne lives in Kingston, Ontario, which is often called the First Capital of Canada and which resides on the shores of Lake Ontario. Two great attractions are located in this wonderful city, the Royal Military College and Old Fort Henry. In this city she now calls home, Suzanne develops and uses her art daily. Currently, she is developing a love relationships with the historic Limestone buildings.

In 2004, she did two solo art exhibits in Kingston, one at the Salon Brisebois, Galerie "les-coups-montés," and another at The Upstairs Gallery. She also participated in a Group Exhibit at the Upstairs Gallery in December of 2004. In addition she did another one in 2006 at the Main library in Kingston, and she is planning to do more in 2007 and 2008.

Her goals: continue showing her art either online or in exhibits. "My art is meant to be viewed, not tucked away in a box in the corner of the attic." The same holds true with her writing, "My writing is meant to be read, not locked away in a journal in a desk." In short, she says, "My art is meant to be seen and my writing meant to be read."

Suzanne finds herself unable to stop her artistic journey. "Every time I think I've done it all, something new comes up and I am challenged to do more. What a great way to be creative.

Imperfect Art

Imperfect Art


My art is imperfect art. If I strive for perfection, I become a clone of someone else's art. How did I come to this conclusion?
Years ago, I did figure drawing. I was striving for perfection which in itself is not a bad thing; however, I noticed as each one of us in the group improved our drawing the human figure, we lost our identity in the art. We had become clones of one another.
Hence, my art is imperfect. Yet I consider it beautiful.


Grow old along with me the best is yet to be.

Grow old along with me the best is yet to be.


My work has developed in many ways, and I know it will continue to grow like the giant trees in the jungle.

Also I wish to do more. Let the art build on itself through the creative mind. Let it have its way at times to see where it will take me. This is what has happened. Every time I finish a project something new interests me.

I am not here to teach the world something; I am only here to present my art in the way "it" wishes to be presented. "My art" is my message. It has a life of its own. As soon as I start to discipline the creativity, it loses something.

Another thing that I believe is necessary with my work is this....

My goal isn't to become a carbon copy of someone else's work no matter how wonderful it may be; otherwise, my art would lose its uniqueness. Even if the work is done with naivety matters little to me. I am not here to show the world that "I know someting about art!" I do art.

If you love art, you will see from my galleries that I play around with more than just one thing. Feel free to visit all of them...I'd love to hear from you so don't forget to check in once in a while...

Hillary Clinton Cartoon

Hillary Clinton Cartoon


Serait-elle une première femme Présidente des Etats Unis? Will she be a first woman president of the United States someday.

Ce livre présente des images cartoon démontrant sa bataille contre Obama en 2008. C'est pour rire.

This book presents iimages in cartoons showing her battle against Obama in 2008. All in good fun.


Obama Cartoons

Obama Cartoons


Serait-il le prochain Président des Etats Unis? Will he be the next President of the United States.


Kingston in Art

Kingston in Art


A black & white study of my art on Kingston, Ontario, Canada. It's now available. If you communicate with me via the guestbook, I can tell you how to get the book.
If you were educated at Queens or Royal Military College, you may find some images of interest.

Une étude en noir et blanc de mes oeuvres sur Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Veuillez me contacter par livre d'or sur les informations nécéssaires pour acheter se livre. Ceux qui ont été a Queens ou le collège militaire royale du Canada trouveront des images d'intérets dans ce livre.

Merci/ Thanks


Kingston Ontario Calendar

Kingston Ontario Calendar


Honourable Peter Milliken, M.P. Kingston and the Islands, has used three Kingston art pieces for his annual calendar (2008)

Gymnastic poses

Gymnastic poses


Greetings!
Let me say that I spend most of my time working on my art at home. My home exists as a centre for my art and writing, keeping in mind that I spend time monitoring my disabled daughter.
Some people need a studio before they can work; I need my home because this is where I'm most comfortable. Even my woodreliefs are done in the living area.
Honestly, I can tell you that I bring my art to you from the heart; home is where the heart is for me.
Art has saved me more times than I can count on my two hands. It's more than a Godgiven gift; it's medicine, therapy, and encouragement.
I feel myself forever exploring new ways of doing what I do. I love writing as well because it gives me another form of freedom of expression.

Art speaks a silent voice
When words fail
It gives freedom
To those
Who don't have a voice
Who are rarely heard
And often ignored

Art communicates
At times when words
Are hard to hear
For those
Who shut their minds
Against the things
That should be heard

Art screams
When words are tuned out
Like warning bells
For a world
Too busy to notice
The plight of those
Who need attention

Suzanne Berton (c)

Kingston Frontenac Library Exhibit 2006

Kingston Frontenac Library Exhibit 2006


Small exhibits of wood reliefs, mainly nature displays in the gallery upstairs.


Small Works Exhibit - Group

Small Works Exhibit - Group


Located at the Upstairs Gallery Kingston, showing 5 works each. Mine were wood reliefs.


With Simplicity

With Simplicity


Another smaller exhibit at the Upstairs Gallery (Kingston Art's Council) allowed me to display various wood reliefs in colour and plain wood.


Faces & Hands exhibit

Faces & Hands exhibit


For a time I was fascinated with faces and hands particularly in wood reliefs. Hands and faces are so expressive that I created a number of pieces for the exhibit titled
'FACES AND HANDS"
Displayed at the Gallery Brisebois, Centre Culturel Frontenac, Marie Rivier, Dalton Rd Kingston, Ontario.
There's never an end to faces and hands in art expression.

Pencil Portraits

Pencil Portraits


I took three images of one person at different stage in her life and brought them together in a time piece using pencil only.
Usually I start with one main piece, deciding where I want to place the pictures and from that one I work the rest of the portraits. As you can see the middle image is central showing this person was once a child and now is a senior.


Ink fun

Ink fun


I use ink here to show what can be done with a little fun and an idea. In this picture, I created what appears to be grain adding a few bugs and a snake in the design. Really this is about a shape. I make a shape from a line, one that is pleasing to my eye and I used the blue ink to finish the picture. No pencil was involved.

This is truly a creative drawing because I didn't plan anything. I just took the line and then the ball attached, and built an idea in ink. It was fun and I rather love the piece.
see it enlarged in my gallery.


Wood reliefs

Wood reliefs


First I find an idea to work with. Totum babies was an idea that I got from the famous Native totum poles, only I wanted to do something with people. In this case three sisters. I worked with pine.
As I do with a drawing, I draw my image, using the knife to cut over the etchings, and from there I being carving bringing to relief what should stand out.
The biggest challenge for me in my woord reliefs is carving too much in an area. Then there's the temperament of the wood. I never thought wood could be like people - gentle, soft or hard and stubbord. When I read a point of difficulty I work with that difficulty to bring out the necessary element of the design.

Draw, Etche, Carve in layers digging out the deepest parts and leaving the surface areas for last.


An idea evolved

An idea evolved


Usually I take an idea or a subject from which I allow creativity to unfold. If I use a landscape or a person, I will allow some of the creativity to have a hold. First you draw what you want and then you work on building this idea with the tools at hand.
It's like chartering a trip at sea in a small boat. You've planned where you want to go and how to get there, but you must go through each part of the trip as in unfolds. If a storm comes you must act accordingly. If a dead wind occurs you must decide what you must to do bring it to life. You don't get to the end of the trip until you've gone through all the chartered parts of the map.

Powered by Artmajeur